Interpretative workshops

 

A series of interpretative workshops took place between 2011 and 2014.

They were sponsored and hosted by the EarthScope National Office (ESNO) at Arizona State University under a grant from the National Science Foundation.

Enjoy the general resources and ideas of activities that came out of these workshops.

AK-Yukon workshop

Workshop Presentations

videos

For the benefit of teachers working in predominantly Native American schools in Minnesota and the Midwest, the EarthScope Program offered a 2 ½-day professional-development workshop in Midwest-based, cross-cultural Earth science at the Palace Casino Hotel located on the lands of the Leech Lake Band of Ojibwe in Cass Lake, Minnesota. This workshop had a place-based emphasis in order to enhance a teachers’ senses of place and present methods and content that are especially relevant to Native American students and communities in the Midwest. During the NSEW, participating teachers worked together with prominent geoscientists, educators, and cultural experts to interpret the stories of the magnificent geological landscapes, resources, and occasional natural hazards of the Midwest. Teachers learned how to apply basic Earth science principles, Midwest-based content, and new findings from the EarthScope Program to update and enrich their own curricula and activities for their students—and obtained continuing-education credit hours!

 

Materials and Resources from the Workshop

 

Some useful links

American Indian Science and Engineering Society

Before There Were Parks video

Geoscience Alliance

g i d a k i i m a n a a n i w i g a m i g

IRIS (Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology)

National Association of Geoscience Teachers

National Earth Science Teachers Association

SCEC (Southern California Earthquake Center)

ShakeOut

Society for Advancement of Chicanos and Native Americans in Science

Steve Semken’s publications page

UNAVCO

2015 Leech Lake Reservation Field Guide and Journal (PDF)

 

Resources from Lisa Lone Fight

American Indian Gardening

ccc5.gif

Earthlodge Lesson Plan

The Birch Tree

Wild Rice

Migration: A Way of life for the Innu 

Indigenous Knowledge Systems

The Four Seasons

Maple Sugar Harvest

Using Google Maps with Indigenous Students

 

Field Trip Guide

Howard Mooers - Field Trip Guide (pdf) (powerpoint)

 

Group Presentations

Group 1 - Shared Phenology (low-res pdf) (powerpoint)

Group 2 - Seafloor Spreading (low-res pdf) (powerpoint)

Group 3 - Minnesota Lakes and Native Uses (low-res pdf) (powerpoint)

Group 4 - Map Modeling Activity (low-res pdf) (powerpoint)

 

Note that group presentation activities show ideas for classroom activities and lessons that have not yet been tested in the classroom.

 

  • Participants and facilitators at the Mississippi River for the Midwest Native Science Educators Workshop! Sunday August 2, 2015

This workshop, seventh in a series of workshops for park rangers, museum educators, and other interpretive professionals sponsored by the EarthScope National Office (ESNO), was motivated by the progress of EarthScope instrumentation into the Eastern United States and by the M5.8 central Virginia (Mineral) earthquake in the summer of 2011.

The central Appalachian Mountain belt and environs are the legacy of a billion-year history of plate-tectonic events including one of the greatest mountain-building events in the geologic history of North America. Today these beautiful mountains are the locations of many of the best-known and most-visited National, State, and regional Parks in the nation. The M5.8 Mineral earthquake in central Virginia in 2011 serves as a reminder that the region is still geologically dynamic, and brought renewed attention to the scientific and societal implications of geological research in the eastern United States.

This workshop, hosted by James Madison University (JMU) and organized by ESNO, featured presentations and collaborations by EarthScope geoscientists and interpretive professionals to better present the geological stories of the Central Appalachian Region to the public, teachers, and students. Workshop participants learned about the EarthScope program and the geological evolution of the Appalachians, learned how to use basic geological information and scientific results from EarthScope and other sources, and developed and presented actual interpretive programs. The workshop also included a geological field trip to the Valley and Ridge to Blue Ridge Province Transition, and a presentation at JMU by EarthScope Speaker Meghan Miller.

 

Regional Tectonics and Geology of the Appalachians (4 parts)

For the benefit of teachers working in predominantly Native American schools in Arizona and the Southwest, the EarthScope Program  offered a 2 ½-day professional-development workshop in Southwest-based Earth science at Arizona State University (14-15-16 March 2015).  This workshop had a place-based emphasis striving to enrich teachers’ senses of place and present methods and content that are especially relevant to Native American students and communities in the Southwest. During the NSEW, participating teachers worked together with prominent geoscientists, educators, and cultural experts to interpret the stories of the magnificent geological landscapes, resources, and occasional natural hazards of Arizona and the Southwest. Teachers learned how to apply basic Earth science principles, Southwest-based content, and new findings from the EarthScope Program to update and enrich their own curricula and activities for their students—and obtained continuing-education credit too!

Presentations:

Geology of the Southwest

Lone Fight: Re-centering the Teaching and Learning of Earth Science Within an Indigenous Context

This three-day workshop happened in Anchorage, Alaska, in April 2014. that features presentations by prominent geoscientists and interpretive professionals to help convey the story of the magnificent landscapes, geology, and natural hazards of the Alaska-Yukon region. Participants will learn how to use basic geology, EarthScope data, and scientific results. Participants will develop and present actual interpretive programs and exhibits during the workshop. Access to digitally-archived and real-time, web-accessible geophysical data will provide a key source of information for such programs.

The workshop is sponsored by the EarthScope National Office (ESNO) at Arizona State University and funded by the National Science Foundation. The host for the EarthScope Alaska-Yukon Regional Workshop for Interpretive Professionals is the Alaska Science Center in Anchorage.

 

Group presentation activities

Note that group presentation activities show ideas for classroom activities and lessons that have not yet been tested in the classroom.

The western United States is a prime target area for EarthScope to investigate processes that result in elevated topography, earthquakes, and volcanism. Interpretive professionals in the Colorado Plateau and Rio Grande Rift region have a unique opportunity to engage the public on the relevance of EarthScope discoveries as they are being made. This three-day workshop combined presentations by EarthScope scientists with interpretive methods to convey the story of how continental rifting and other processes result in the region's breathtaking landscape and geological hazards.

The workshop was held October 26-28, 2009 at the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science in Albuquerque. This was the fourth in a series of workshops for park rangers and museum educators sponsored by the EarthScope National Office. Participants learned how to use EarthScope data and science results, and developed and presented interpretive programs on the evolving landscape and its connections to aspects of the natural and cultural history of the Colorado Plateau-Rio Grande Rift region.

Organizations represented included the National Park Service, U. S. Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management, Nature Conservancy, New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs, New Mexico State Parks, Texas State Parks, Southern California Earthquake Center, San Bernardino County Museum, Red River Community House, Four Corners School of Outdoor Education, Smithsonian Institution, Chinle Unified School District, New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, Public Lands Intepretive Association, Asombro Institute for Science Education, Rough Rock Community School, Arizona State University, Edinboro University of Pennsylvania, and Lafayette College.

The workshop featured presentations by scientists and interpretive specialists to convey the story of how continental rifting and other processes result in the region's breathtaking landscape and geological hazards. Instructors were from Arizona State University, New Mexico Tech, University of New Mexico, New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, University of Colorado, Grand Canyon National Park, Oregon State University, IRIS, and UNAVCO. Details and Agenda [PDF]

Participants and scientists worked in teams to develop and present interpretive programs aimed at audiences and settings encountered by interpreters in parks and museums. Five programs revolved around the following themes.

1. The Rio Grande Rift and its waters have provided a spiritual and physical passageway for many cultures.

2. The Rio Grande Rift Valley is a dynamic environment for water, volcanoes, peoples and scientific exploration.

3. The Albuquerque volcanic field and the Rio Grand Rift are evidence of past processes within the Earth which continue to shape the landscape.

4. Four sacred mountains mark the boundaries of Dine bikejah (Navajo homeland). Each mountain was formed at a different time by a unique set of geologic processes that illustrate the major warp in which mountains are formed. This geographic area represents ke′ (kinship), a sacred living landscape to the Navajo people.

5. EarthScope scientific instruments have helped us to better understand the evolution of the New Mexico landscape, including opening of the Rio Grande Rift.

Workshop Presentations

  • EarthScope Colorado Plateau - Rio Grande Rift Workshop Overview
    EarthScope Colorado Plateau - Rio Grande Rift Workshop Overview
    B. Lillie (Oregon State Universioty/ES National Office)
    PDF Version [9.8 MB]
  • USArray and other deep seismic studies of continental structure and processes in the Colorado Plateau and Rio Grande Rift
    USArray and other deep seismic studies of continental structure and processes in the Colorado Plateau and Rio Grande Rift
    R. Aster (PASSCAL)
  • EarthScope: Educational programming in Museums
    EarthScope: Educational programming in Museums..."Science Cafes"
    J. Aubele (New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science)
    PDF Version [4.6 MB]
  • Rio Grande Rift GPS Measurements
    Rio Grande Rift GPS Measurements
    H. Berglund (CIRES/University of Colorado)
    PDF Version [7.7 MB]
  • Linking Earth’s mantle to water quality and unique microbial ecosystems
    Linking Earth’s mantle to water quality and unique microbial ecosystems
    L. Crossey (University of New Mexico)
    PDF Version [2.1 MB]
  • Tectonic evolution of the western US- a brief discussion
    Tectonic evolution of the western US- a brief discussion
    K. Karlstrom (University of New Mexico)
    PDF Version [3.5 MB]
  • Interpretive themes and strategies for the Colorado Plateau – Rio Grande Rift
    Interpretive themes and strategies for the Colorado Plateau – Rio Grande Rift
    A. Mathis (Grand Canyon National Park)
    PDF Version [2.4 MB]
  • Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology
    Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology
    P. McQuillan (IRIS)
    PDF Version [1 MB]
  • Active Earth Display Cascadia and Basin and Range Content Modules
    Active Earth Display Cascadia and Basin and Range Content Modules
    P. McQuillan (IRIS)
    PDF Version [1.6 MB]
  • Which Way are We Going? Online Mapping Tools to Help People Visualize Plate Motions with GPS Data
    Which Way are We Going? Online Mapping Tools to Help People Visualize Plate Motions with GPS Data
    S. Olds (UNAVCO)
    PDF Version [3 MB]
  • Alternative Views of Colorado Plateau and Rio Grande Rift Parklands Using Remote Sensing Imagery and Astronaut Photographs
    Alternative Views of Colorado Plateau and Rio Grande Rift Parklands Using Remote Sensing Imagery and Astronaut Photographs
    J. Reese (Edinboro University of PA)
    PDF Version [4.3 MB]
  • Sense of place and place-based geoscience education and interpretation in the Colorado Plateau – Río Grande Rift region
    Sense of place and place-based geoscience education and interpretation in the Colorado Plateau – Río Grande Rift region
    S. Semken (Arizona State University)
    PDF Version [1.1 MB]